Artificial Feeding and Rearing of the Aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), on a Completely Defined Synthetic Diet

Abstract

SINCE the classic study of Hamilton1 in 1935 on the artificial feeding of Myzus persicae (Sulzer), many attempts have been made to feed and maintain various aphid species on gels, or on liquids, sometimes under pressure, accessible to the insects via various natural and artificial membranes2–8. Although limited uptake of some fluid was demonstrated or could be inferred from slight increases in the survival of the aphids in these studies, no instances of prolonged survival, growth or of development have been reported.

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MITTLER, T., DADD, R. Artificial Feeding and Rearing of the Aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), on a Completely Defined Synthetic Diet. Nature 195, 404 (1962). https://doi.org/10.1038/195404a0

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