Spontaneous Cytomegalic Inclusion Body Disease involving Lacrimal Glands of Cæsarian-derived (so-called) Pathogen-free Rats

Abstract

HISTOLOGICAL study of lacrimal glands in laboratory rodents revealed cytological changes, for example, nuclear polymorphism and inclusions characteristic of cytomegalic inclusion body disease in rats of the Sprague–Dawley strain; no other organs were involved. Lesions occurred in both intra- and ex-orbital glands of males only at an age of six months or older and with an incidence of 100 per cent. Similar observations have recently been published for eight rat colonies of different geographical locations1. The disease is apparently widespread among laboratory rats. Guinea pigs, a variety of mouse strains, both golden and Chinese hamsters, Wistar and Fisher rats, either commercially obtained or bred and raised in the Roscoe B. Jackson Laboratory, were free of the disease.

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References

  1. 1

    Lyon, H. W., Christian, J. J., and Miller, C. W., Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. and Med., 101, 164 (1959).

  2. 2

    Ward, T. G., Symposium V (Germ-free animals) Seventh Int. Cong. Microbiol. “Recent Progress in Microbiology,” ed. G. Tunevall, 350 (Almqvist and Wiksell–Stockholm, 1958).

  3. 3

    Fitzgerald, R. J., ibid., 352.

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MEIER, H. Spontaneous Cytomegalic Inclusion Body Disease involving Lacrimal Glands of Cæsarian-derived (so-called) Pathogen-free Rats. Nature 188, 506–507 (1960). https://doi.org/10.1038/188506b0

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