Letter | Published:

Chemical Nature of the Fluorescent Pigment produced in Microsporum- infected Hair

Nature volume 180, pages 860861 (26 October 1957) | Download Citation

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Abstract

SINCE Margarot and Deveze1, studying tinea capitis in man, discovered in 1925 that infected hairs would fluoresce upon exposure to ultra-violet light, extensive use has been made of this phenomenon both in diagnosis and in evaluating the progress of therapy. In spite of numerous studies of the properties of the fluorescent pigment2–8, the chemical nature of the fungus metabolite responsible for fluorescence has not been discovered.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.

    • FREDERICK T. WOLF

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/180860a0

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