The Blood Group Antigen Diego in North American Indians and in Japanese

Abstract

THE blood group antigen Diego has been reported to be present with not inconsiderable frequency in Indians of South America1, but absent in 1,000 Caucasoids in the United States2. The second example of anti-Diego was identified by Levine and Robinson (unpublished observation) in a specimen submitted by Witebsky and Rosamilia. Using the latter serum, we have found the antigen Diego to be present in 16 of 148 unrelated Chippewa Indians in northern Minnesota, and 6 of 77 unrelated Japanese in Winnipeg. This suggests that Diego may be an Asiatic character. The family in which Witebsky and Rosamilia found anti-Diego was Polish, and we know from the frequency of the gene B that there is probably a somewhat greater admixture of Asiatic blood in Poland than there is farther west in Europe. The antigen Diego promises to be of great anthropological interest.

References

  1. 1

    Layrisse, M., Arends, T., and Domingues Sisco, R., Acta Med. Venez., 3, 132 (1953). Junqueira, P. C., Wishart, P. J., Ottensooser, F., Pasqualin, R., Loureiro Fernandez, P., and Kalmus, H., Nature, 177, 41 (1956).

  2. 2

    Levine, P., Robinson, E. A., Layrisse, M., Arends, T., and Domingues Sisco, R., Nature, 177, 40 (1956).

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LEWIS, M., AYUKAWA, H., CHOWN, B. et al. The Blood Group Antigen Diego in North American Indians and in Japanese. Nature 177, 1084 (1956). https://doi.org/10.1038/1771084a0

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