Infectious Complications

Infectious complications during neutropenia subsequent to peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

Abstract

Type, severity and incidence of infection during the neutropenic period after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) for treatment of malignant disease were studied in 66 patients treated at a single institution. Data of 34 female and 32 male patients with a median age of 43 years suffering from leukemia (12), lymphoma (35), multiple myeloma (six) or solid tumors (13) were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had received at least 2.5 × 106 CD34-positive cells for stem cell rescue after high-dose chemotherapy. Ninety-four percent of the patients experienced at least one febrile episode during their post-transplant course. The patients recovered quickly and defervesced after a median of 4 days. The incidence of bacteremia was 39% and gram-positive cocci were the predominant pathogens. In contrast, severe organ infections were rare. Only 5% of the patients suffered from lung infiltrates. No invasive fungal infections were observed. No transplant-related deaths occurred in the 66 patients studied. We conclude that the severe, but shortlasting neutropenia after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation is associated with a high incidence of bacterial infection. The severity of the majority of these infections is moderate. With appropriate anti-infective therapies these infections can be managed and life-threatening infectious complications, in particular fungal infections, are rare. Empirical anti-infective regimens specifically designed for this clinical situation should be explored.

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Kolbe, K., Domkin, D., Derigs, H. et al. Infectious complications during neutropenia subsequent to peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant 19, 143–147 (1997). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1700621

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Keywords

  • infection
  • neutropenia
  • autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

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