Letter | Published:

An Experimental Demonstration of the Dependence of Phyllotaxis on Rate of Growth

Nature volume 169, pages 10521053 (21 June 1952) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THERE is probably fairly general agreement to-day that new leaves arise in the first available space, be this space determined by the inhibitional fields of adjacent primordia1 or according to a more generalized theory of geometrical packing2. The apex possesses no intrinsic spiral properties; but as the Snows2,3 and others have shown, the phyllotaxis depends on circumstances and can be altered, or the genetic spiral reversed, by various experimental treatments.

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Affiliations

  1. Botany Department, Auckland University College, New Zealand.

    • L. H. MILLENER

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https://doi.org/10.1038/1691052a0

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