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Commonwealth Plant Breeders' Meeting

Nature volume 162, page 175 (31 July 1948) | Download Citation

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Abstract

AN informal meeting of Commonwealth plant breeders was held at the School of Agriculture, Cambridge, during June 24-25. Representatives from Australia, Canada, England, Malaya, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Tanganyika and Wales were present ; Dr. P. S. Hudson, director of the Commonwealth Bureau of Plant Breeding and Genetics, acted as chairman. The proceedings of the meeting included a review by Dr. P. S. Hudson and Mr. R. H. Richens of the work of the Commonwealth Bureau of Plant Breeding and Genetics since the last similar meeting, short reports by the delegates of the principal lines along which plant breeding is developing in the various Commonwealth countries, and an account by Dr. P. S. Hudson of the results of the meeting held at Washington last April, between the Food and Agriculture Organisation, the Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and other bodies, on genetic stocks. Among the resolutions passed at the meeting, several deprecated any reduction in the number or length of the abstracts appearing in Plant Breeding Abstracts, the periodical published by the Commonwealth Bureau of Plant Breeding and Genetics ; support was given to a proposal to institute a standing inquiry service whereby plant breeders should be sent details at regular intervals of all published articles bearing on their own field of research ; and suggestions Were made to provide for an efficient service for the maintenance of genetic stocks of crop plants. The proceedings of the meeting will be circulated to the delegates and to other interested bodies.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/162175b0

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