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Egyptology in the University of Liverpool: Prof. A. M. Blackman

Nature volume 162, page 95 (17 July 1948) | Download Citation

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WITH the retirement, on reaching the age-limit, of Dr. Aylward M. Blackman from the Brunner chair of Egyptology, which he has held since 1934, the University of Liverpool loses a fruitful teacher and a valued contributor to a number of branches of ancient Egyptian studies. Born at Norwich in 1883, and a keen student of Egyptology from the age of sixteen, Dr. Blackman was educated first privately, then at St. Paul‘s School, London, and Queen‘s College, Oxford, where in 1906 he took a first class in Oriental Studies. During 1906-14 and 1920-21 he took part in or directed excavations and recording in Egypt (Oxyrhynchus, Abydos, Meir, El-Amarnah) and the Sudan (Survey of Nubia, Buhen, Faras, Sesebi). During 1912-18 he was Laycock Student of Egyptology of Worcester College, Oxford. Since 1935 he has been joint editor, with Prof. J. P. Droop, of the Annals of Archaeology and Anthropology, and during 1922-35 was a member of the Council of the Royal Asiatic Society. From 1936 on he has been special lecturer in Egyptology in the University of Manchester. His publications have been numerous ; chief among them are four volumes on "The Rock Tombs of Meir" (1914-24), with about eighty plates drawn by himself, and volumes on the Lower Nubian temples of Dendur, Derr and Bigeh. Other works deal especially with Egyptian myth and ritual. He has done much to present Ancient Egypt to a wide public. All Egyptologists will hope that it will be possible for Dr. Blackman to continue his Egyptological researches for many years to come.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/162095a0

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