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Mathematics at Queen Mary College, London : Dr. G. C. McVittie, O.B.E

Nature volume 162, page 56 (10 July 1948) | Download Citation

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THE appointment of Dr. G. C. McVittie to the new chair of mathematics at Queen Mary College, University of London, is of considerable interest, not only because he will be the first professor of mathematics at this College, but also because his appointment will go a long way towards strengthening the present somewhat meagre representation of applied mathematicians among the appointed teachers of the University. In pre-war days, Dr. McVittie was well known for his researches into relativistic theories and in particular for his trenchant criticisms of some aspects of certain forms of the cosmological theory. During the Second World War, Dr. McVittie was seconded for special service with the Meteorological Office. Here he was engaged in a number of important problems. As a result of his successful activities both as a man of science and as an administrator he was recently awarded the O.B.E. Since his return to academic life, Dr. McVittie has developed a new interest in the theoretical basis of meteorology and has been made a member of the Meteorological Research Committee. He has also become, with Prof. Ferraro, one of the editors of the new Quarterly Journal of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, the first number of which has recently appeared, and which seems destined to have an important influence on the future development of applied mathematics in Great Britain. Dr. McVittie has also been very actively interested for many years in problems of theoretical astronomy and has been one of the editors of The Observatory.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/162056b0

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