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Intake of milk fat, reflected in adipose tissue fatty acids and risk of myocardial infarction: a case–control study

Abstract

Objective:

To study the association between content of fatty acids from milk fat (14:0, 15:0 and 17:0) in adipose tissue and risk of a first myocardial infarction (MI).

Design and subjects:

A case–control study with 99 patients and 98 population controls both men and postmenopausal women, age 45–75 year. Adipose tissue fatty acids were determined by gas–liquid chromatography.

Results:

The content of 14:0, 14:1, 15:0, 17:0 and 17:1 were all significantly higher in adipose tissue of controls than of the patients. Age and sex adjusted odds ratios (OR) for MI were significantly reduced with increasing quartiles of 14:0, 14:1, 15:0 and 17:1 in adipose tissue, but except for 15:0 (OR=0.36, 95% CI 0.13–0.99), the trend was no longer significant after further adjustment for waist-to-hip ratio, smoking and family history for coronary heart disease. Correlations between 14:0 and 15:0 in adipose tissue, and waist-to-hip ratio were significantly negative (r=−0.22 for both, P<0.01).

Conclusion:

Our study suggests that intake of dairy fat or some other component of dairy products, as reflected by C15:0 as marker in adipose tissue, may protect persons at increased risk from having a first MI, and that the causal effects may rely on other factors than serum cholesterol.

Sponsorship:

Throne Holst's foundation for Nutrition Research, Research Council of Norway, The Norwegian Association of Margarine Producers, DeNoFa Fabriker A/S, TINE BA.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Kari Almendingen, Hege Møklebust Rebnord, Ragnhild Lekven Fimreite and Thomas S Haugen for their effort in the main study.

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Correspondence to J I Pedersen.

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Guarantor: JI Pedersen.

Contributors: JR, DST and JIP were responsible for ideas, design and coordination of the study. JIP contributed to the interpretation and writing. MBV contributed to the statistical analysis and writing. ASB was responsible for statistical analysis and writing.

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Biong, A., Veierød, M., Ringstad, J. et al. Intake of milk fat, reflected in adipose tissue fatty acids and risk of myocardial infarction: a case–control study. Eur J Clin Nutr 60, 236–244 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602307

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602307

Keywords

  • pentadecanoic acid
  • myristic acid
  • heptadecanoic acid
  • milk fat
  • coronary heart disease
  • biological markers

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