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Influence of repeated consumption of beverages containing sucrose or intense sweeteners on food intake

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the influence of ingestion of beverages with sucrose or with intense sweeteners on food intake (FI) and on hunger ratings in before and after a month of daily consumption of beverages.

Design: Experimental study.

Setting: Department of Physiology, University Hospital, Dijon, France.

Subjects: In all, 12 men and 12 women, aged 20–25 y.

Interventions: Four beverages contained either sucrose (E+:100 g/l, 1672 kJ) or intense sweeteners (E−: null energy content) and were flavoured with either orange (O) or raspberry (R). FI was measured in the lab during two 2-consecutive-day periods, carried out on 2 successive weeks (session 1). The subjects drank 2 l of either E+ or E− beverages on the first day of both weekly periods, according to a balanced randomised design. E+ was paired with O for 50% of subjects and with R for the other 50%. Subjects were then habituated over a 4-week period to both beverages, consuming 1 l of E+ beverage on odd days and 1 l of E– drink on even days. After this period, the measurements of session 1 were repeated (session 2, weeks 7–8). Finally, FI was measured for two more 2-day periods (weeks 9–10) after the association between flavour and energy content was reversed (session 3).

Results: The E– drinks were less palatable than the E+ drinks. Besides, we observed that FI was not reduced in response to a liquid extra caloric load and there was no change in hunger ratings after the beverages in any of the sessions.

Conclusion: Ingestion of caloric beverages induced a positive energy balance and the continuous exposure phase to these beverages over 1 month did not improve FI adaptation in response to the extra energy provided by the beverages.

Sponsorship: This study was sponsored by SEV, Bourg la Reine, France; the French Ministère de la Recherche et de la Technologie (Programme AGROBIO-Aliments Demain) and the Regional Council of Burgundy (Dijon, France).

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank F Fuchs and P Noirot for their technical assistance.

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Contributions

Guarantor: M Fantino.

Contributors: VVW contributed to writing. MBT was responsible for conduct of the experiments, recording of food intakes, results analysis and writing. MF was responsible for design of protocol, recording of food intakes, results analysis, discussion and writing. VLG was responsible for initiation of the study and discussion.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to M Fantino.

Appendix A

Appendix A

Food choices provided during the ad libitum lunches and dinners are given in Table 3.

Table 3

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Van Wymelbeke, V., Béridot-Thérond, ME., de La Guéronnière, V. et al. Influence of repeated consumption of beverages containing sucrose or intense sweeteners on food intake. Eur J Clin Nutr 58, 154–161 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601762

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601762

Keywords

  • feeding behaviour
  • human
  • caloric beverages
  • intense sweeteners
  • aspartame
  • sucrose
  • food intake control
  • flavour

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