Original Communication | Published:

The paradoxical nature of hunter-gatherer diets: meat-based, yet non-atherogenic

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition volume 56, pages S42S52 (2002) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Objective: Field studies of twentieth century hunter-gathers (HG) showed them to be generally free of the signs and symptoms of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Consequently, the characterization of HG diets may have important implications in designing therapeutic diets that reduce the risk for CVD in Westernized societies. Based upon limited ethnographic data (n=58 HG societies) and a single quantitative dietary study, it has been commonly inferred that gathered plant foods provided the dominant energy source in HG diets.

Method and Results: In this review we have analyzed the 13 known quantitative dietary studies of HG and demonstrate that animal food actually provided the dominant (65%) energy source, while gathered plant foods comprised the remainder (35%). This data is consistent with a more recent, comprehensive review of the entire ethnographic data (n=229 HG societies) that showed the mean subsistence dependence upon gathered plant foods was 32%, whereas it was 68% for animal foods. Other evidence, including isotopic analyses of Paleolithic hominid collagen tissue, reductions in hominid gut size, low activity levels of certain enzymes, and optimal foraging data all point toward a long history of meat-based diets in our species. Because increasing meat consumption in Western diets is frequently associated with increased risk for CVD mortality, it is seemingly paradoxical that HG societies, who consume the majority of their energy from animal food, have been shown to be relatively free of the signs and symptoms of CVD.

Conclusion: The high reliance upon animal-based foods would not have necessarily elicited unfavorable blood lipid profiles because of the hypolipidemic effects of high dietary protein (19–35% energy) and the relatively low level of dietary carbohydrate (22–40% energy). Although fat intake (28–58% energy) would have been similar to or higher than that found in Western diets, it is likely that important qualitative differences in fat intake, including relatively high levels of MUFA and PUFA and a lower ω-6/ω-3 fatty acid ratio, would have served to inhibit the development of CVD. Other dietary characteristics including high intakes of antioxidants, fiber, vitamins and phytochemicals along with a low salt intake may have operated synergistically with lifestyle characteristics (more exercise, less stress and no smoking) to further deter the development of CVD.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

    • L Cordain
  2. Departments of Radiology and Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    • SB Eaton
  3. Human Nutrition Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

    • J Brand Miller
  4. Department of Food Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

    • N Mann
  5. Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

    • K Hill

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Correspondence to L Cordain.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601353