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Television in the United States

Nature volume 160, page 118 (26 July 1947) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The Radio Corporation of America has played a prominent pioneer part in the practical development of television in the United States, more particularly since 1923, when Dr. V. K. Zworykin applied for a patent on the now world-famous iconoscope. Much of this pioneer work has been inspired by Brigadier General Sarnoff, president of the Radio Corporation of America, and it is the purpose of an illustrated booklet recently issued by the Information Department of the Corporation (New York, 20) to present excerpts from General Sarnoff's statements on the subject at various public meetings and demonstrations during the past twenty-four years. Much of the results of the work conducted in the research laboratories of the R.C.A. is described in scientific and technical papers published in various journals, including the R.C.A. Review, to which reference was made in Nature of September 14, 1946 (p. 373). The publishers of this Review have now issued a bibliography of technical papers on television by R.C.A. authors. This includes some 275 technical papers on television and closely related subjects published during the period 1929–46, and arranged generally in chronological order. This “Television Bibliography” is in the same handy size (about 9 in. × 6 in.) as the R.C.A. Review, and should prove useful and convenient to all those concerned with the study, development and application of television. It is to be regretted that while the references give the year and month of publication, they do not give the volume and page number of the journal in question.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/160118c0

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