News | Published:

Prof. E. P. Cathcart, C.B.E., F.R.S.

Nature volume 160, page 117 (26 July 1947) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

Prof. E. P. Cathcart retires from the regius chair of physiology, University of Glasgow, this summer after having completed almost twenty years service in the senior chair of the Institute of Physiology. The previous nineteen years he spent as Gardiner professor of physiological chemistry in the same Institute. Cathcart matriculated as a student in 1895 and graduated M.B., Ch.B. in 1900. Four years later he took his M.D., and in 1906 received the degree of D.Sc. Periods of foreign study were passed in Munich, Berlin and Petrograd (with Pavlov), and with F. C. Benedict at the Carnegie Institution at Boston. It was in 1905 that Cathcart was appointed Grieve lecturer in physiological chemistry in his alma mater: then from 1915 until 1919 he was professor of physiology in the London Hospital Medical School. During the First World War he occupied an important post in our anti-gas measures and held the rank of lieutenant-colonel. Afterwards he became a member of the Army Advisory Committee on Nutrition and on Hygiene. He was also a member of the Technical Committee on Nutrition of the League of Nations, and served on the Medical and Agricultural Research Councils. He was for many years a member of the General Medical Council. Among the other posts which he has held, his chairmanship of the Industrial Health Research Board and of the Scottish Health Services Committee are probably the most outstanding.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/160117a0

Authors

    Comments

    By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

    Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing