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EMISSION OF RADIO-WAVES BY THE GALAXY AND THE SUN

Nature volume 159, pages 752753 (31 May 1947) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE remarkable investigations of Reber1, South worth2 and Appleton3 have shown that radio-waves in the metre and centimetre region are emitted by the galaxy and the sun. Henyey's and Keenan's theory of long-wave emission by the galaxy4 is based on the assumption that the mechanism of this emission is a free-free emission from interstellar gas. However, they have not correctly accounted for the absorption of radio-waves in the galaxy. Besides free-free absorption (which Henyey and Keenan took into account), there is an ordinary absorption of radio-waves because of damping oscillations of electrons in the field of radio-waves. The coefficient of absorption is given by

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Sternberg Astronomical Institute of the Moscow State University

    • JOSEPH S. SHKLOVSKY

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/159752a0

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