News | Published:

The Ray Society

Nature volume 159, page 670 (17 May 1947) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

THE annual general meeting of the Ray Society, now in its hundred and third year, was held on March 21. During the past year the Society lost by retirement owing to ill-health the services of its two senior officers, Sir Sidney Harmer, president since 1931, and Dr. W. T. Caiman, secretary since 1919. Resolutions were passed unanimously thanking them for their distinguished services to the Society. Prof. F. E. Weiss having expressed the wish to retire from the office of honorary treasurer, his resignation was accepted with regret. Mr. A. D. Cotton resigned as vice-president. It was announced that Dr. Ben Dawes' volume on “The Trematoda of British Fishes” is ready for distribution, and, owing to the greatly increased costs of publication, this will form the issue to subscribers for the two years 1944 and 1945. The volume for 1946 will be Dr. Berrill's volume on “British Tunicates”, but unexpected difficulties have caused delay in sending this work to press. A volume on Pennant's travels in Europe, edited by Prof. G. R. de Beer, is, however, nearly ready for press, and other works on a wide variety of subjects relating to the natural history of the British Islesare in active preparation. The following were elected officers and new members of council ; President, Prof. G. R. de Beer ; Hon. Treasurer, Mr. A. C. Townsend ; Hon. Secretary, Dr. Errol I. White ; Vice-presidents, Prof. F. E.Weiss, Mr. M. A. C. Hinton, Mr. E. R. Martin and Lieut.-Colonel Seymour Sewell ; Members of Council, Mr. A. H. G.Alston, Dr. J. W. Evans, Mr. H. R. Hewer, Dr. George Taylor and Mr. Brian Vesey-Fitzgerald.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/159670a0

Authors

    Comments

    By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

    Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing