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Botany at Sydney: Prof. N. A. Burges

Nature volume 158, page 659 (09 November 1946) | Download Citation

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Abstract

DR. N. A. Burges, University demonstrator and fellow of College, Cambridge, has been appointed vo the chair of botany in the University of Sto-drlpy, in succession to Prof. Eric Ashby. Born Atralia, he graduated at Sydney in 1931, after he began researches in mycology. In 1934 he went to Cambridge as a research student with an Australian scholarship and carried out investigations in plant pathology. He soon showed himself to be a man of exceptional ability. He took an active part in the life of Emmanuel College and was prominent in athletics. He graduated Ph.D. in 1937 and was awarded a senior 1851 Exhibition. In the following year he was elected a research fellow of his College. Early in the War he joined the R.A.F.V.R. and was attached to the signals branch of Bomber Command, retiring in 1945 with the ranfe of wing-commander. On returning to Cambridge he was made a University demonstrator, and in addition to continuing his researches, especially on soil fungi and mycorrhiza, greatly assisted in restoring the Botany School to its peace-time activities. Dr. Burges has wide botanical interests both in the field and in the laboratory, for which he will have ample scope at Sydney. He certainly will be an inspiration to his students. His Cambridge colleagues, though personally regretting his departure, are confident that he will maintain the prestige already associated with the Sydney Department of Botany. Both the University and his native country are to be congratulated on his return.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/158659c0

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