BREEDING METHODS IN LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT

Abstract

PROBABLY at no time during the past hundred years has there been so much current of changed attitudes and values sweeping through the minds of stockbreeders. While the general public may have noted the effects of the war-time food policies on milk production and on the sheep, pig and poultry populations, it is fair to suggest that only those who face the practical aspects of the British livestock industry recognize the multiplicity of problems that the war situation, added to the general trends, has left. The recent years have thrust many changes upon this branch of British agriculture-not the least of which may be those of thought regarding the aims, methods and responsibilities of the different sections of the industry. It may be significant, in one sense, that, throughout the whole of the meetings on February 26 and 27 of the British Society of Animal Production, the well-known and still hardy phrase 'the stud farm of the world' was not once used. There was no lack of opportunity, since breeding methods, techniques and aims were the main items under discussion.

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NICHOLS, J. BREEDING METHODS IN LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT. Nature 157, 523–524 (1946). https://doi.org/10.1038/157523a0

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