TRAINING AND SUPPLY OF APPLIED BACTERIOLOGISTS

    Abstract

    THE rapid advances in knowledge which have taken place in bacteriology in recent years, the increasing importance of biological studies in academic curricula and of their impact on industrial research, and the emphasis now laid on the place of science in the social and industrial structure, have made it highly desirable that the training of bacteriologists should be adequate for the tasks ahead and that the growing demand for bacteriologists in different fields should be met by a corresponding supply of trained personnel from the various centres. These questions were considered with some care at recent meetings of a sub-committee appointed by the Society of Applied Bacteriology and including representatives of the Society for General Microbiology. This committee included members with experience in teaching, in research, and in advisory work, and was constituted as follows: Dr. L. A. Allen, Prof. B. T. P. Barker, Prof. H. D. Kay, Dr. T. Gibson, Mr. D. A. McKenzie, Dr. T. Richards, Dr. R. T. St. John-Brooks, Prof. J. F. D. Shrewsbury, and Mr. S. B. Thomas.

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    TRAINING AND SUPPLY OF APPLIED BACTERIOLOGISTS. Nature 157, 490–491 (1946). https://doi.org/10.1038/157490a0

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