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NEWTON AND THE SCIENCE OF TO-DAY

Naturevolume 150pages710715 (1942) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THREE hundred years have elapsed since Newton was born, and 276 since his fertile mind had conceived most of those fundamental ideas, the development of which was to add such lustre to his name and be of such outstanding value to science: in astronomy the idea of universal gravitation ; in physics the theory of colours ; in mathematics the differential and integral calculus (or, as he would have said, the direct and inverse fluxions) as well as the binomial theorem and the method of infinite series. He tells us he had thought of all these before he was twenty-four years old, although he wrote little about most of them until many years later.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/150710a0

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