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TIMBER-SEASONING KILNS

Nature volume 150, pages 127128 (25 July 1942) | Download Citation

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Abstract

TWO leaflets have recently been issued by the Forest Research Institute, Dehra Dun, India, on the subject of timber seasoning kilns by M. A. Rehman, Utilization Branch (For. Res. Inst. Public. Vasant Press, Dehra Dun, 1941-42). Leaflet No. 11, “Types of Timber Seasoning Kilns suitable for drying Indian Woods”(1942), describes briefly the various types of seasoning kilns which have been designed or tested by the Forest Institute. It was due to the position in which we found ourselves during the last War in the matter of timber supplies, especially perhaps in the demand for, and absence of, seasoned timber for the increasing aeroplane construction, that led to the first marked improvements in artificial kiln seasoning. Experiments and research in this direction were taken up at the Institute in the early years after the War, and this small leaflet gives briefly some of the results which have been reached -results which are at least as important economically as in temperate zones. The general principles of the steam-heated internal-fan kiln and four types of furnace kilns are discussed, the direct-heated forced-circulation furnace kiln, the indirect-heated internal-fan furnace kiln, the new F. R. I, furnace kiln and the hot air kiln. The results of tests show that a steam-heated internal-fan kiln is suitable for the seasoning of almost all kinds of woods. Of the furnace kilns, the first mentioned above is suitable for drying furniture woods, the second for drying packing-case timbers only, the third for the slow seasoning of furniture woods and the fourth for completing the drying of partially air-seasoned half-wroughts for the manufacture of certain types of articles. The third of these furnace kilns is cheaply manufactured, was designed at the Research Institute and is termed the indirect-heated thermal-circulation furnace kiln.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/150127b0

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