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George Martine

Abstract

SIR D'ARCY THOMPSON has recalled in a recent article (Scotsman, Dec. 27) the work of the eighteenth-century Scottish physician, George Martine, who died in 1741. Martine went to the University of St. Andrews at the age of thirteen, and later proceeded to Leyden to study under Boerhaave ; there he took his M.D. in 1725. He returned to practice in St. Andrews, and at the age of about forty was made fleet surgeon to Admiral Vernon for the Cartagena expedition. Smollett was a surgeon's mate in the same expedition, and Sir D'Arcy believes that his surgeon Macshane in “ Roderick Random ” was really Martine. Martine died of malarial fever when the expedition was in the Caribbean Sea.

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George Martine. Nature 149, 166 (1942). https://doi.org/10.1038/149166c0

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