(1) Early Medieval Medicine (2) Medicina aborigen Americana (3) A Brief Rule to Guide the Common-People of New-England how to Order Themselves and theirs in the Small Pocks, or Measels (4) A Discourse upon the Institution of Medical Schools in America (5) Adaptation in Pathological Processes

Abstract

(1) IN his work on early medieval medicine Prof. C. MacKinney, who occupies the chair of medieval medicine in the University of North Carolina, gives a richly documented account of medicine in that portion of the Middle Ages extending from the sixth to the eleventh century. During that period two distinct types of medicine were prevalent, namely, the supernatural, which included reliance on Christian saints and their relics, Christian-Pagan charms and magical incantations, and human medicine, which consisted chiefly of empirical methods of healing mainly by drugs, surgery and diet. Of the three lectures contained in the book the first deals with the changing modern conceptions of the Middle Ages formerly regarded as stagnant and unproductive but now looked upon as an era of vigorous activity.

(1) Early Medieval Medicine

With Special Reference to France and Chartres. By Prof. Loren C. MacKinney. (Publications of the Institute of the History of Medicine, the Johns Hopkins University. Third Series: The Hideyo Noguchi Lectures, Vol. 3.) Pp. iii + 247 (9 plates). (Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins Press; London: Oxford University Press, 1937.) 12s. 6d. net.

(2) Medicina aborigen Americana

Por el Dr. Ramon Pardal. (Humanior, Biblioteca del Americanista Moderno, Sección C: Patrimonio cultural indiano, Tomo 3.) Pp. 377 + 6 plates. (Buenos Aires: Jose Anesi, n.d.) n.p.

(3) A Brief Rule to Guide the Common-People of New-England how to Order Themselves and theirs in the Small Pocks, or Measels

By Thomas Thacher. Facsimile Reproductions of the three known editions, with an Introductory Note by Dr. Henry R. Viets. (Publications of the Institute of the History of Medicine, the Johns Hopkins University. Fourth Series: Bibliotheca Medica Americana, Vol. 1.) Pp. liv + 16. (Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins Press; London: Oxford University Press, 1937.) 7s. net.

(4) A Discourse upon the Institution of Medical Schools in America

By John Morgan. Reprinted from the first edition, Philadelphia, 1765. With an Introduction by Abraham Flexner. (Publications of the Institute of the History of Medicine, the Johns Hopkins University. Fourth Series: Bibliotheca Medica Americana, Vol. 2.). Pp. vin + vii + xxviii + 63. (Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins Press; London: Oxford University Press, 1937.) 9s. net.

(5) Adaptation in Pathological Processes

By Dr. William H. Welch. Reprinted from Transactions of the Congress of American Physicians and Surgeons, 1897, Vol. 4, pp. 284–310. With an Introduction by Dr. Simon Flexner. (Publications of the Institute of the History of Medicine, the Johns Hopkins University. Fourth Series: Bibliotheca Medica Americana, Vol. 3.) Pp. xi + 58. (Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins Press; London: Oxford University Press, 1937.) 7s. net.

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ROLLESTON, J. (1) Early Medieval Medicine (2) Medicina aborigen Americana (3) A Brief Rule to Guide the Common-People of New-England how to Order Themselves and theirs in the Small Pocks, or Measels (4) A Discourse upon the Institution of Medical Schools in America (5) Adaptation in Pathological Processes. Nature 144, 308–309 (1939). https://doi.org/10.1038/144308a0

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