National Parks and the Preservation of the Flora and Fauna of Great Britain

    Abstract

    IN his presidential address to the Conference of Delegates of Corresponding Societies on the use of national parks in Great Britain for the preservation of the fauna, Lord Onslow points out that the term 'national park' covers any natural reserve or open space to which the public have access regardless as to whether it is to be devoted to the preservation of fauna and flora or not, and Lord Onslow discusses methods of utilization of such national parks. The question of the desirability of re-introducing and acclimatizing animals now extinct in Great Britain, such as the reindeer, wild pig, beaver, Irisli stoat and lemming, has also to be considered.

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    National Parks and the Preservation of the Flora and Fauna of Great Britain. Nature 142, 349–350 (1938). https://doi.org/10.1038/142349a0

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