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Viscosity of Air and the Electronic Charge

Nature volume 141, pages 10161017 (04 June 1938) | Download Citation

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Abstract

FROM measurements of wave-lengths of X-ray lines with ruled grating and from the Bragg angles of reflections from crystals, it is possible to compute the magnitude of the electronic charge. The value thus obtained by Bearden1 and Bäcklin2 is 4·807 χ 10-10 E.S.U., which is considerably higher than Birge's3 best estimate of Millikan's oil drop value of electronic charge (4·770 ± 0·005) × 10-10 E.S.U. Millikan has in his own experiment4 assumed a value for the viscosity of air at 23° C. of (1822·6 ± 0·04 × 10-7 C.G.S. units, which is based only on the observations of Harrington5.

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References

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    , Phys. Rev., 37, 1210 (1931).

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    , NATURE, 141, 82 (Jan. 8, 1938).

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Physics, Ravenshaw College, Cuttack.

    • G. B. BANERJEA
    •  & B. PATTANAIK

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https://doi.org/10.1038/1411016c0

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