News | Published:

Gift to the Massachusetts Institution of Technology

Nature volume 139, page 279 (13 February 1937) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

IN connexion with the announcement last month of a bequest of one million dollars to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the will of Mr. Charles Hayden, Dr. Karl T. Compton, president of the Institute, has issued a statement in the course of which he says that: “Mr. Hay den's generous bequest to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology only serves to emphasize the constructive value of his lifelong interest in the institution and the great personal loss suffered in his passing. At the time of his death, he was not only a member of the corporation of the Institute but was also a member of its finance committee, chairman of its student loan fund committee and chairman of the research associates of M.I.T. To the latter two of these activities Mr. Hayden had been a generous contributor as well as active in their administration. Mr. Hay den's interest … in his professional training in mining engineering was given material expression in his contribution of a principal portion of the funds used in the construction of the Institute's building devoted to mining and metallurgy. In addition to these major contributions Mr. Hayden was continually and quietly contributing to student needs. … His specific bequest of one million dollars to the Institute gives us great encouragement and will enable us quickly to make substantial progress in the twelve and a half million dollar program of objectives which were approved by the corporation last October as representing the urgent needs of the institution at this time.”

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/139279c0

Authors

    Comments

    By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

    Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing