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Magnetic Effects associated with Bright Solar Eruptions and Radio Fade-Outs

Nature volume 139, page 244 (06 February 1937) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE association of certain disturbances of the earth’ s magnetic field with bright hydrogen eruptions in the neighbourhood of sunspots, first indicated by Prof. Young, led to the conclusion that the solar effect was propagated to the earth with the velocity of light. Fresh impetus has been given these investigations by the observation of extensive radio fade-outs reported by Dellinger1, at whose request special spectroheliograms were made at the Mount Wilson Observatory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, to investigate possible correlations2. A notable fade-out, a marked magnetic and earth-current disturbance, and an unusually bright hydrogen eruption on the sun, all occurring simultaneously, were observed from 16h 45m to 17h 03m, G.M.T., on April 8, 1936, at the Huancayo (Peru) Magnetic Observatory of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington3 and elsewhere. Since then, two other pronounced similar occurrences, one on August 25 and another on November 6, have been reported from the Observatory4, 5, and many instances of a less conspicuous nature have occurred6.

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References

  1. 1.

    Phys. Rev., 48, 705 (1935).

  2. 2.

    , Pub. Astr. Soc. Pacific, 47, 325 (1935). 48, 122 (1936); Terr. Mag., 41, 197 (1936);

  3. 3.

    , , , Terr. Mag., A, 41, 199 (1936).

  4. 4.

    , Terr. Mag., 41, 404, (1936).

  5. 5.

    , , , and , Terr. Mag., 41, 407, (1936).

  6. 6.

    , Phys. Rev., 50, 1189, (1936).

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, D.C. Dec. 24.

    • A. G. McNISH

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https://doi.org/10.1038/139244a0

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