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Societies and Academies

    Naturevolume 134pages822824 (1934) | Download Citation

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    Abstract

    LONDON Royal Society, November 15.—A. R. MEETHAM and G. M. B. DOBSON: The vertical distribution of atmospheric ozone in high latitudes. Observations to determine the vertical distribution of the ozone in the atmospheresimilar to those recently made at Arosawere carried out at Troms0 in May and June, 1934. They show that the average height of the ozone is very slightly lower at the higher latitude and indicate that at Tromsa the ozone is more con centrated in a region centred at a height of 21 km. above sea-level, whereas in Switzerland it is more uniformly distributed through the lower 30 km. of atmosphere. G. G. SHERRATT and E. GRIFFITHS: The determination of the specific heat of gases at high temperatures by the sound velocity method. The experiments recorded carry the determination of the specific heat of carbon monoxide by this method up to a temperature of 1800° C. By working with more than one frequency and correcting the data for the effect of frequency on the velocity of sound in the gas, the specific heat in the temperature range 1000°-1800° C. is found to be in good agree ment with that deduced from spectroscopic data. Specific heats based on sound velocity measurements in various gases have not hitherto been found to be in accord, even at moderately high temperatures, with those obtained from spectroscopic data. The discrepancy is probably due to the use of a single frequency, for it is now known from practical and theoretical considerations that the velocity of sound in a gas is not necessarily independent of the frequency.

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    https://doi.org/10.1038/134822a0

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