The British Postgraduate Medical School

    Abstract

    LONDON has a supply of clinical material—that is, cases of sickness and disease—almost unique in amount and variety, which should be available for teaching and research. Some of this material is utilised by the medical schools in then attached hospitals for the training of their undergraduate students, whom they must in the main serve, and their facilities for the additional training of the postgraduate student are necessarily limited. In fact, London has hitherto lacked an organisation for postgraduation study comparable to the continental centres, such as Vienna. London's wealth of clinical material should be available for the provision of courses of advanced instruction for qualified doctors resident in Great Britain, in the Empire beyond the seas, and abroad, who wish to refresh or extend their knowledge, or to obtain the latest information on new developments in medicine, surgery and obstetrics.

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