Letter | Published:

Phenomenal Regression to the Real Object

Nature volume 131, page 544 (15 April 1933) | Download Citation

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Abstract

I agree with Prof. Peddie that the Fechner relationship need not necessarily involve a single sensation strength for every stimulus strength, but that implication is strongly suggested by the habitual statement, as the fundamental law of sensation strength, of a law which expresses this strength as a function of one variable (stimulus strength) and not of three or more. The attitude of mind induced by Fechner's law has certainly been the relative neglect of the effects of spatial and temporal contrast (treating these as mere disturbing factors) and the complete neglect of the effect of the total situation under complex conditions of perception. This seems to be sufficient justification for making Fechner's law the starting point of a description of a quantitative investigation of the effects of the total situation.

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  1. Department of Psychology, University, Glasgow.

    • ROBERT H. THOULESS

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/131544b0

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