The Great Barrier and the Formation of Coral Reefs

Abstract

DR. YONGE divided the plan of operations of the Great Barrier Beef Expedition into four sections: (1) the detailed study of the feeding of corals; (2) the plankton and sea-water; (3) an ecological study of corals and associated organisms; and (4) the examination of the bottom flora and fauna, with the determination of the zoning of life at increasing depths (NATUEE, 121, 213; 1928). The British Museum (Natural History) has now commenced to publish the results in these four sections. Dr. Yonge's own work is mainly included in vol. 1 and has been already sufficiently summarised in NATUBB, 127, 309; 1931. It is a very remarkable study of the feeding of corals, from which he concludes that symbiotic algae are “an indispensable factor in the necessarily exceptional powers of growth and repair possessed by the marine communities known as coral reefs”. This is as much as concerns the student of the formation of coral reefs.

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GARDINER, J. The Great Barrier and the Formation of Coral Reefs. Nature 129, 748–749 (1932). https://doi.org/10.1038/129748a0

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