A New Type of Secondary Radiation

IF we assume that the X-ray scattering of the ‘unmodified’ type observed by Prof. Compton corresponds to the normal or average state of the atoms and molecules, while the ‘modified’ scattering of altered wave-length corresponds to their fluctuations from that state, it would follow that we should expect also in the case of ordinary light two types of scattering, one determined by the normal optical properties of the atoms or molecules, and another representing the effect of their fluctuations from their normal state. It accordingly becomes necessary to test whether this is actually the case. The experiments we have made have confirmed this anticipation, and shown that in every case in which light is scattered by the molecules in dust-free liquids or gases, the diffuse radiation of the ordinary kind, having the same wave-length as the incident beam, is accompanied by a modified scattered radiation of degraded frequency.

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RAMAN, C., KRISHNAN, K. A New Type of Secondary Radiation. Nature 121, 501–502 (1928). https://doi.org/10.1038/121501c0

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