Metallurgy of Cast Iron: a Complete Treatise for Engineers, Foundrymen, and Students

Abstract

CAST iron has a very limited literature in comparison with steel, and it is only lately that any considerable attention has been given to its scientific study, although isolated workers have attempted from time to time to elucidate its complex problems. The author of this little book has an extensive practical experience of the subject, and has been responsible for several improvements in technical practice. He therefore speaks with authority on matters concerning the foundry. Cupola and moulding practice are not dealt with, and the book is devoted to the chemical and physical characteristics of cast iron in their relation to its use in the foundry. The chemistry is not always correct, but the errors will not mislead the practical reader to any serious extent. The vexed question of the relations between sulphur and manganese deserves more detailed; consideration than it receives here, but it is a point on which an author scarcely dares to be dogmatic.

Metallurgy of Cast Iron: a Complete Treatise for Engineers, Foundrymen, and Students.

By J. E. Hurst. (The Specialists' Scrips.) Pp. xvi + 311. (London: Sir Isaac Pitrman and Sons, Ltd.; 1926.) 15s. net.

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D., C. Metallurgy of Cast Iron: a Complete Treatise for Engineers, Foundrymen, and Students . Nature 120, 255–256 (1927) doi:10.1038/120255a0

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