The Problem of the Origin of Species as it Appeared to Darwin in 1859 and as it Appears to us To-day1

Abstract

The first of these objects, that is, the establishment of a belief in descent with modification, was always held by my father to be the more important of the two; for I once heard him say, if a recollection of about fifty years' standing may be trusted, that “after all, evolution is the great thing, not natural selection.”—LEONARD DARWIN, “Organic Evolution,” pp. 1, 2.

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OSBORN, H. The Problem of the Origin of Species as it Appeared to Darwin in 1859 and as it Appears to us To-day1. Nature 118, 270–273 (1926). https://doi.org/10.1038/118270a0

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