Books Received | Published:

(1) What I Believe (2) The Religion of a Darwinist: Conway Memorial Lecture delivered at South Place Institute on March 26, 1925 (3) Science and Religion

Naturevolume 115pages667669 (1925) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE fame of most scientific men depends on their positive contributions to some particular branch of science: but Huxley's fame depends mainly on the clarity and fearlessness with which he not only expressed scientific conclusions, but also extended their application to the beliefs popularly held in his time, and particularly to theological beliefs. The smoke of controversy rolled round his writings forty or fifty years ago, and, though some of it has cleared away, it still continues to roll round the subjects on which he wrote. The three short books referred to above are sufficient evidence of this.

(1) What I Believe.

By Bertrand Russell. (To-day and To-morrow Series.) Pp. 95. (London: Kegan Paul and Co., Ltd.; New York: E. P. Dutton and Co., 1925.) 2s. 6d. net.

(2) The Religion of a Darwinist: Conway Memorial Lecture delivered at South Place Institute on March 26, 1925.

By Sir Arthur Keith. Pp. 76. (London: Watts and Co., 1925.) 2s. net.

(3) Science and Religion.

By Prof. J. Arthur Thomson. Pp. ix + 238. (London: Methuen and Co., Ltd., 1925.) 7s. 6d. net.

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  1. Search for J. S. HALDANE in:

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https://doi.org/10.1038/115667a0

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