Human Geography: an Attempt at a Positive Classification—Principles and Examples

    Abstract

    THE student of modern geography by whom this classical work is read for the first time, might well feel that even in the few years, little more than a decade, since the original issue, most of this manual has become, if not out-of-date, at least somewhat antiquated. A youthful applicant for a situation was asked “Where is Tokyo?” He replied, “I do not know.” The employer expressed his astonishment in vigorous terms, and the youth continued, But if you will tell me where it is, I will tell you why it is there. “This youth was a product of his period; the geography of to-day seeks to answer the question” why? The aim of modern geography is to probe, to evolve generalisations, to eliminate and thus simplify complex phenomena in which the psychological factor is of supreme importance.

    Human Geography: an Attempt at a Positive Classification—Principles and Examples.

    Jean Brunhes. Translated by Prof. I. C. Le Compte. Edited by Isaiah Bowman and Prof. Richard Elwood Dodge. Pp. xvi + 648. (London, Calcutta and Sydney: G. G. Harrap and Co., Ltd., n.d.) 21s. net.

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    Human Geography: an Attempt at a Positive Classification—Principles and Examples . Nature 115, 76 (1925) doi:10.1038/115076a0

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