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British (Terra Nova) Antarctic Expedition, 1910–1913 The Physiography of the Ross Archipelago Physiography of the Beardmore Glacier Region Physiography (Robertson Bay and Terra Nova Bay Regions)

Nature volume 113, pages 777778 (31 May 1924) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THESE three valuable memoirs on the work of the Terra Nova Expedition of 1910-1913 describe in further detail the physiography of especially interesting parts of South Victoria Land. Each part is illustrated by the profusion of excellent photographs and maps characteristic of the Terra Nova memoirs. Mr. R. E. Priestley describes the north-eastern corner of South Victoria Land around Robertson Bay and Cape Adare. Mr. Debenham throws fresh light on the Ross Archipelago, now the best-known part of Antarctica. Mr. Wright describes the Beardmore Glacier, the great high road to the Pole discovered by Shackleton. The three memoirs reconsider and discuss some of the earlier conclusions. Mr. Priestley, in his discussion of the physiography of the Robertson Bay region, is disposed to favour for Antarctica the early hypothesis that glaciation was due to uplift. He recognises that this explanation is not applicable to the best-known glaciated regions, and it is. not supported by his own suggestion (p. 57) that the recent uplift of the coast has been due to the removal of the former heavy load of ice. He reduces the estimated thickness of the Drygalski Ice-Tongue and rejects the view that it gouged out the valley from which it flows. Mr. Priestley's monograph illustrates the present tendency to attach greater importance to marine ice than has been usual in recent years. He invokes floating ice to explain the occurrence of the kenyte boulders found 200 miles north from the outcrops of that rock., and says in reference to the deposit that covers the floor of the Ross Sea that it is “in fact the precursor of the boulder clay which will be found everywhere on the Ross Sea bottom if and when it is raised above the level of the sea.”

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https://doi.org/10.1038/113777a0

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