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Spiranthes autumnalis

Abstract

IN NATURE of February 10, p. 185, Prof. Bower describes the finding of the orchid Spiranthes autumnalis near Carrbridge in the summer of 1921. I have to report the discovery of a single specimen of this orchid in the first week of September 1922, on Docharn Craig, a small hill (1250 ft.) four miles south-east of Carrbridge. The hill is under cultivation up to 1100 ft. on the southern side, but on the northern side there are the remains of a wood of magnificent wind-sown pines. The floor of the wood is covered with Vaccinium spp. (mainly oxycoccus), mixed in places with Erica Tetralix and E. cinerea : earlier in the season Pyrola rotundifolia and Trientalis europea were abundant. Only one plant of Spiranthes autumnalis was found, although the interest attaching to its unexpected discovery in this locality led to a careful search of the whole wood. The specimen was unfortunately lost in the transit to town, but when fresh it was quite unmistakable.

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SMITH, E. Spiranthes autumnalis . Nature 111, 291 (1923). https://doi.org/10.1038/111291c0

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