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The Galactic System1

Abstract

II. IN the first part of this article the main characteristics of the globular and open clusters were discussed, and it was shown bow the determination of their distances led to the proposal of extremely great dimensions for the galactic system. A theory of the origin and structure of the Galaxy also seems to be indicated by the observations.

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REFERENCES

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    Lund Meddelanden, Series 2, No. 19.

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    Bul. Nat. Research Council, No. 11, p. 174.

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    Proc. Acad. Sci. Amsterdam, 20, p. 1108; 21, p. 36.

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    Mt. W. Contr. 155, and 175, P. 11.

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    I first tried out the method six years ago (Mt. W. Contr. 116, p. 81), but abandoned it as wholly unsuited to the brighter stars in globular clusters. The Kapteyn luminosity curves for separate spectral types, however, may be of high value.

  6. 6

    Bul. Ast. Inst. Neth., No. 8.

  7. 7

    Kapteyn and van Rhijn state that eight Cepheids of long period are known in two globular clusters. In my paper from which they get their data (Mt. W. Contr. 151) I show that twelve long-period Cepheids occur in the five globular clusters Messier 3, 5, 13, 15, and Omega Centauri. Four of these clusters contain also large numbers of short-period Cepheids only one or two magnitudes fainter than the long-period Cepheids. Unpublished results obtained at Harvard show that long-period Cepheids occur in other globular clusters.

  8. 8

    Mt. W. Contr. 153, Mt. W. An. Rep. for 1918, and elsewhere.

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    Russell, Astroph. Jour. 54, p. 140.

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    Observatory, May 1922.

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    Bul. Nat. Research Council, No. 11, p. 184, 190.

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    The photovisual magnitudes for Messier 11, however, are probably affected by a serious scale error; the colour indices do not agree with the spectra subsequently determined (Mt. W. Contr. 120 and 228).

  13. 13

    Mt. W. Commun. 62, p. 6; cf. also Hubble, Mt. W. An. Rep. for 1922, p. 251.

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    Mt. W. Contr. 115, p. 12, 125, p. 10, and 161, p. 13.

  15. 15

    Mt. W. Contr. 156, p. 5.

  16. 16

    Harv. Bul. 763.

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    Mt. W. Contr. 156, p. 5, and 157, p. 14.

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    Zeits. für Physik, 7, p. 390.

  19. 19

    Mon. Not. R.A.S. 79, p. 19.

  20. 20

    This conclusion may not hold for close double stars, as certain results from eclipsing binaries are not in full agreement; the less dense, dark companion is believed to be, frequently, less massive and also less developed than its primary.

  21. 21

    Harv. Bul. 765; Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 8, p. 69.

  22. 22

    Pub. Ast. Soc. Pac., October 1919.

  23. 23

    Mt. W. Contr. 213 and 214.

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    Mt. W. Contr. 156, p. 12; cf. Graff, Ast. Nach. 5133.

  25. 25

    Jour. of Geol. 29, p. 502.

  26. 26

    The annual number brighter than the tenth magnitude actually exceeds forty, according to Bailey's data. Pub. Am. Ast. Soc. 4, p. 248.

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