Skip to main content

Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser (or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer). In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.

Awareness of the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension (JSH 2000) and compliance to its recommendations: surveys in 2000 and 2004

Abstract

Clinic physicians' awareness of the Japanese hypertension guideline (JSH 2000) and compliance with its recommendations were assessed to derive policy implications for effective blood pressure control. Data were obtained from two postal questionnaire surveys conducted in 2000 and 2004, and subjects were 896 and 1425 clinic physicians, respectively, who were engaged in general internal medicine. Recognition rates of JSH 2000 were 63.1% (n=822) before its announcement in 2000 and 94.4% (n=1400) in 2004. Rates of access, familiarity and utilisation of JSH 2000 were 87.0, 81.6 and 68.9%, respectively (n=1400) in 2004. As for major management strategies for low-risk hypertension: in 2000, for patients with 140–149/90–94 mmHg, 81.5% of 812 respondents performed lifestyle modification, and 11.2% prescribed medicines, whereas for patients with 150–159/95–99 mmHg, 71.7% of 807 respondents prescribed medicines, and 24.3% conducted lifestyle modification; in 2004, 90.0% of 1384 respondents conducted lifestyle modification, 22.6% prescribed medicines, 2.5% referred patients to other facilities, and 6.4% did nothing. In 2004, 68.9% of 1388 respondents agreed with the new definition of hypertension, whereas 17.1% preferred 160/95 mmHg. Respondents' age (P<0.05) and a percentage of hypertensives in daily patient load (P<0.0005) significantly associated with the choice of the old criteria. In conclusion, JSH 2000 achieved a substantial improvement in clinic physicians' awareness and their compliance to its recommendations on low-risk hypertension management. One of the strategies for further enhancement in their compliance with JSH 2004 would be its dissemination to those who are old and/or do not see hypertensive patients so frequently.

Your institute does not have access to this article

Relevant articles

Open Access articles citing this article.

Access options

Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

$32.00

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. Cuspidi C, Michev I, Meani S, Severgnini B, Sala C, Salerno M et al. Awareness of hypertension guidelines in primary care: results of a regionwide survey in Italy. J Hum Hypertens 2003; 11: 541–547.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Dickerson JEC, Garratt CJ, Brown MJ . Management of hypertension in general practice: agreements with and variations from the British Hypertension Society guidelines. J Hum Hypertens 1995; 9: 835–839.

    CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  3. Hagemeister J, Schneider CA, Barabas S, Schadt R, Wassmer G, Mager G et al. Hypertension guidelines and their limitations – the impact of clinic physicians' compliance as evaluated by guideline awareness. J Hypertens 2001; 19: 2079–2086.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  4. Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines Subcommittee for the Management of Hypertension. Guidelines for the management of hypertension for general practitioners. Hypertens Res 2001; 24: 613–634.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines Subcommittee for the Management of Hypertension. Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension (JSH 2004). Japanese Society of Hypertension: Tokyo, 2004 (in Japanese).

  6. Saito I, Kawabe H, Tsujioka M, Hirose H, Shibata H . Trends in pharmacologic management of hypertension in Japan: one year after the publication of the JSH 2000 guidelines. Hypertens Res 2002; 25: 175–178.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  7. Goto Y, Kawakami T, Tada H, Sugawara M, Kawanabe K, Shiota Y et al. Kouketsuatsu no tiryo ni kansuru jittaichousakenkyuu. J Japan Phys Assoc 2003; 18: 181–192 (in Japanese).

    Google Scholar 

  8. Hyman DJ, Pavlik VN . Self-reported hypertension treatment practices among primary care physicians: blood pressure thresholds, drug choices, and the role of guidelines and evidence-based medicine. Arch Intern Med 2000; 160: 2281–2286.

    CAS  Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgements

This study was financially supported with a grant in 2000 from the Ministry of Health and Welfare for the Research on Disease Management of Hypertension and Relevant Diseases (H12-iryo-002, principal investigator: Dr Toshihiko Hasegawa) and with another grant in 2004 from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare for the Research on Evaluation of Clinical Guidelines (H14-iryo-035, principal investigator: Professor Tomonori Hasegawa).

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to N Ikeda.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Ikeda, N., Hasegawa, T., Hasegawa, T. et al. Awareness of the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension (JSH 2000) and compliance to its recommendations: surveys in 2000 and 2004. J Hum Hypertens 20, 263–266 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.jhh.1001977

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Accepted:

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.jhh.1001977

Keywords

  • hypertension
  • guideline
  • JSH 2000
  • awareness
  • compliance

Further reading

Search

Quick links