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Evolution

Nature volume 96, pages 618619 (03 February 1916) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE object of this work is apparently to provide, in small compass and with copious illustrations, an account of evolution from the lowest forms of life to man. “The Evidence for Evolution” forms the subject-matter of the first chapter, in which well-chosen lines of argument are briefly laid down and illustrated. The three succeeding chapters treat respectively of “Unicellular and Multicellular Animals,” “The Worms and some of their Posterity,” and “The Early Vertebrates and the Fishes.” The fifth, “The Conquest of the Land,” leads on to the sixth and concluding chapter, “The Mammals and Man.” The illustrations, 146 in number, are largely borrowed from German sources, although the author is wrong in attributing the bust of Homo primigenius (Fig. 145) to a German sculptor. It was modelled by an American lady, daughter of Alphaeus Hyatt, who will be affectionately remembered by many British naturalists. It is unfortunate that the abundant illustration should have been permitted to justify the heavy, thickly loaded paper used throughout the book. Apart from this distressing feature, the printing is good and clear, and there are not many errors, among which, however, “Neandertal,” “Axolotyl,” and “trachea” for the plural (p. 71) were noticed. The figures are sometimes good and mostly adequate, a small proportion being distinctly bad. In some of them the description fails to account for the whole of the reference letters.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/096618a0

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