(1) Suspension Bridges, Arch Ribs, and Cantilevers (2) Technical Mechanics, Statics, and Dynamics (3) Mechanical Refrigeration (4) The Human Factor in Works Management (5) Elasticità e resistenza dei corpi pietrosi Mattoni, Pietre, Malte e Calcestrussi, Murature

    Article metrics

    Abstract

    PROF. BURR is so well known as a writer on bridges that another work from his pen will be welcomed by engineers, particularly as he deals with the problems connected with large suspension bridges, about which he is particularly qualified to speak as a consulting engineer. The problem of the stiffened suspension bridge in general is dealt with in an exhaustive manner, preceded by a treatment of the perfectly flexible cable or frame loaded vertically. A useful table is given for the lengths of cables assuming a parabolic form, an assumption which is generally made by engineers in designing, for the loading is so nearly uniform per unit of length of span that the catenary is almost the same as the parabola. This leads to an interesting deduction as to the approximate greatest length of span for different ratios of central deflection of cable to span. Thus, taking 60,000 lb. per sq. in. as the working stress for steel wire and the above ratio 10, we find that a span of 13,740 ft. is possible. The friction in the joints of a link cable is shown, and the stresses due to friction in the pins of eye bars become larger than is generally supposed, and the resulting bending moments are by no means negligible. The theory of the straight stiffeningtruss based upon the elastic deformation of the structure assumes that there is no sensible variation from the parabolic form of cable or frame. The thermal stresses in stiffened suspension bridges are discussed. This work should find a ready acceptance among engineers and students alike.

    (1) Suspension Bridges, Arch Ribs, and Cantilevers.

    By Prof. W. H. Burr. Pp. xi + 417. (New York: J. Wiley and Sons, Inc.; London: Chapman and Hall, Ltd., 1913.) Price 19s. net.

    (2) Technical Mechanics, Statics, and Dynamics.

    By Prof. E. R. Maurer. Pp. vii + 356. (New York: J. Wiley and Sons, Inc.; London: Chapman and Hall, Ltd., 1914.) Price 10s. 6d. net.

    (3) Mechanical Refrigeration.

    By Prof. H. J. Macintire. Pp. ix + 346. (New York: J. Wiley and Sons, Inc.; London: Chapman and Hall, Ltd., 1914.) Price 17s. net.

    (4) The Human Factor in Works Management.

    By J. Hartness. Pp. ix + 159. (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co.; London: The Hill Publishing Co., 1912.) Price 6s. 3d. net.

    (5) Elasticità e resistenza dei corpi pietrosi Mattoni, Pietre, Malte e Calcestrussi, Murature.

    By Ing. Alfredo Montel. Pp. vi + 180. (Torino: S. Lattes and Co., 1914.) Price 5 lire.

    Access options

    Rent or Buy article

    Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

    from$8.99

    All prices are NET prices.

    Rights and permissions

    Reprints and Permissions

    About this article

    Cite this article

    (1) Suspension Bridges, Arch Ribs, and Cantilevers (2) Technical Mechanics, Statics, and Dynamics (3) Mechanical Refrigeration (4) The Human Factor in Works Management (5) Elasticità e resistenza dei corpi pietrosi Mattoni, Pietre, Malte e Calcestrussi, Murature. Nature 93, 609–610 (1914) doi:10.1038/093609a0

    Download citation

    Comments

    By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.