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The Ideals and Organisation of a Medical Society

Nature volume 92, page 422 (11 December 1913) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE name of Reading, at the present moment, is mostly associated with political excitement; but Reading has many interests, and, among them, it is the home of one of the best of all the provincial medical societies. Dr. Hurry has done well to write an account of the work, purposes, and constitution of a medical society. He is a good friend to Reading; he loves its history, its old buildings; he has made many gifts to the town; he has been, for years, its chief chronicler; and the Reading Pathological Society is an example of all that a medical society ought to be. Indeed, a good medical society is a very great help to a town. It raises the level of things; it promotes the spirit of science; it ensures the efficiency of the town's hospital; it is a bond of union among practitioners; it adds dignity, distinction, and modernity to their art, and friendship and ambition. The interchange of knowledge, the comparison of experiences, the criticism, the honourable competition, all tend to achievement. Of course, there are difficulties; the hard-worked doctor cannot easily find time to attend meetings or to prepare papers. Waste of time, repetition, overlapping of subjects, are to be avoided, but are not always easy of avoidance. But a good medical society, such as the Reading Pathological Society, is an excellent help to men in practice, and to the town in which they practise.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/092422a0

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