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How to Colour Photographs and Lantern Slides by Aniline Dyes, Water and Oil Colours, Crystoleum, and other Processes

Abstract

ALTHOUGH in the greater number of cases the less handwork there is on a photograph the better, it is often possible to apply colour to photographs and lantern slides in such a manner as not to interfere in any way with their value as impersonal records, and at the same time to increase considerably their value for demonstration purposes, and, in certain circumstances, to enhance their beauty. Experience has shown that the most suitable results are obtained by special methods, without the knowledge of which even the most skilful worker suffers a great disadvantage. It is the technicalities of these special methods that the author describes, dealing first with transparencies and colouring or tinting photographs on the face of them, and in the second part with the art of applying colours on their backs. He gives full instructions as to tools, colours, and processes without wasting any space in “artistic” platitudes.

How to Colour Photographs and Lantern Slides by Aniline Dyes, Water and Oil Colours, Crystoleum, and other Processes.

By R. Penlake. Pp. 77. (London: G. Routledge and Sons, Ltd.; Dawbarn and Ward, Ltd.; n.d.) Price 1s. net.

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How to Colour Photographs and Lantern Slides by Aniline Dyes, Water and Oil Colours, Crystoleum, and other Processes . Nature 86, 109 (1911). https://doi.org/10.1038/086109b0

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