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Intra-abdominal adipose tissue deposition and parity

Abstract

Objective:

To determine the relationship between body composition/fat distribution and parity after adjusting for potential confounders: age, smoking, and physical activity.

Design:

Cross-sectional.

Subjects:

A total of 170 Caucasian women between the ages of 18 and 76 years, who were non-smokers with no cardiovascular disease, diabetes, metabolic, or endocrine disorders.

Measurements:

Physical activity assessment (Baecke Physical Activity Questionnaire), anthropometric measures, and body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, computed tomography).

Results:

Although percent body fat was related to parity (r=0.26, P<0.01), after adjusting for age, physical activity index, and smoking, the parity–percent body fat relationship was no longer significant. Multiple regression analysis for modeling intra-abdominal adipose tissue demonstrated that parity and intra-abdominal adipose tissue were significantly related after adjusting for percent body fat, physical activity index, and smoking (partial r=0.18, P=0.02, unstandardized β=5.22±2.26, intercept=−37.32±24.63).

Conclusion:

Our data suggest that intra-abdominal adipose tissue increases with increasing parity, even after adjusting for potential confounders: age, percent body fat, physical activity, and smoking.

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Correspondence to T E Blaudeau.

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Blaudeau, T., Hunter, G. & Sirikul, B. Intra-abdominal adipose tissue deposition and parity. Int J Obes 30, 1119–1124 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803252

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803252

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • fat distribution

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