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BMI: a poor surrogate for diet and exercise in assessing risk of death

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Cundiff, D. BMI: a poor surrogate for diet and exercise in assessing risk of death. Int J Obes 30, 1173–1175 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803236

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