The Human Mechanism, its Physiology and Hygiene and the Sanitation of its Surroundings

    Abstract

    MANY writers of text-books on physiology for the lay public are quite incompetent to act as teachers of their fellow men, because they are unacquainted with the science they profess to write about, or imagine that a description of the bones and a few other anatomical facts constitutes physiology so far as the general public are concerned. There are, of course, some books which are notable exceptions to this rule, but we never remember to have seen one before which so admirably fits the purpose for which it is written as the little treatise before us, which the authors have labelled “The Human Mechanism.”

    The Human Mechanism, its Physiology and Hygiene and the Sanitation of its Surroundings.

    By Prof. Theodore Hough Prof. W. T. Sedgwick. Pp. ix+564. (Boston and London: Ginn and Co., 1906.) Price 8s. 6d.

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    The Human Mechanism, its Physiology and Hygiene and the Sanitation of its Surroundings . Nature 75, 318–319 (1907). https://doi.org/10.1038/075318b0

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