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Meteorological Observations

Nature volume 74, pages 622623 (18 October 1906) | Download Citation

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Abstract

TERRESTRIAL Physics in Messina.—The Annuario of the Messina Observatory for the year 1905 shows that Prof. G. B. Rizzo has made a good beginning in the important task recently imposed upon him by the faculty of the university. The climate of Sicily is fairly well known so far as the principal towns are concerned, thanks to the efforts of the directors of the large observatories of Palermo and Catania and others, but, as Prof. Rizzo points out, little or nothing is known about the conditions of the other parts of the island. To remedy this want a number of rainfall and temperature stations have been established during the last year in the province of Messina, and have recorded observations from the beginning of 1906. On the initiative of the International Meteorological Committee, the Solar Committee of which Sir Norman Lockyer is president is carrying out an important study of the connection of solar and terrestrial phenomena; for Italy, Prof. Riccò at Catania and Prof. Rizzo at Messina are actively engaged in the investigation on the general plan laid down by the committee. For the study of earthquake phenomena one of Vicentini's microseismographs has been erected; in connection with this subject Prof. Rizzo is investigating the facts relating to the terrible Italian earthquake of September, 10, with the cooperation of more than eighty observatories in various parts of the world. The seismograms show that the disturbance was felt from Norway to the Cape of Good Hope, and from California to New Zealand. The complete results will shortly be published.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/074622a0

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