Miscellany | Published:

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Nature volume 74, pages 570574 (04 October 1906) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE results of the Gordon-Bennett balloon race, as announced in the daily papers, show that the sixteen competitors who started from Paris on Sunday afternoon all landed within a belt comprised between the meridians of 1° east and 1° west of Greenwich. The longest and most northerly journeys were those of Lieut. Lahm (U.S.A.), who landed near Whitby—about 400 miles from Paris—after a journey of 231/2 hours; Signor Vonwiller (Italy), near Hull; Comte de la Vaulx (France), near Walsingham, four miles from the Norfolk coast; and the Hon. C. S. Rolls, near Sandringham. A second group landed in the south of England, this group comprising M. J. Balsan (France), at Singleton, near Chichester; Prof. Huntington (Great Britain), at Sittingbourne, Kent; and Captain Kindelan (Spain), near Chichester. The next group were carried from Paris in directions between west and north-west, and landed on or near a strip of the French coast extending from Dieppe to near Caen. These were Herr Scherle (Germany), near Dieppe; Mr. F. H. Butler (England), Comte de Castillon (France), and Señor Salamanca (Spain), all three at Blonville, near Trouville; Baron von Hewald (Germany), at Coudé, near the mouth of the Seine; Captain von Abercron (Germany), at Villerssur-Mer; and Lieut. Herrera (Spain), at Cabourg. A little south of this group, M. Santos Dumont landed at Broglie, after having met with an accident to his arm. A different course was followed by the Belgian competitor, M. van den Driesche, who landed at Bretigny, a place 19½ miles south of Paris, soon after midnight.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/074570a0

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