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Two Books on Angling1

Nature volume 74, pages 568569 (04 October 1906) | Download Citation

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Abstract

IN “Salmon Fishing” Mr. Hodgson deals with the spirit, rather than the technique, of the sport. The first half-dozen chapters of the book are a series of essays on different aspects of fishing, and they are written in a most attractive manner and provide excellent reading. In the chapter on the “Elusive quarry,” for instance, the instincts, or rather whims, of the salmon are written about very pleasantly. Mr. Hodgson discusses the old question as to whether or not the salmon feeds in fresh water, and is inclined to think that when the fish rises to a fly it does so with the intention of eating. Evidence against this contention was collected a few years ago by the Scottish Fishery Board, and it was shown that the epithelium of the stomachs of salmon in fresh water was in a catarrhal condition that made digestion impossible. It is, on the whole, the simplest solution of this questisn that the salmon, when it rises to a fly, does so urged by some kind of sporting instinct.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/074568a0

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